Solido

You’ll find some of history’s most iconic cars in our 1:43 Collection range, each available with their own individual plastic showcases.

Showing 1 - 18 of 36 items
  • The Ford Escort RS Cosworth is the sporty version of the Escort sedan introduced in the early Nineties. It is the offspring of a long line of sports compact cars made by Ford. Inspired by the Sierra Cosworth with its 4-wheel drive, it was equipped with a 2.0L turbo engine of 220 hp. This version saw 2500 units of it produced to satisfy the homologation in...

  • This car is said to have saved the Peugeot brand in the Eighties. If the Peugeot 205 has long been an icon, it is largely thanks to this GTI version, released on the 1st of March, 1984. The Golf had opened the breach, and the 205 followed through in style. The 1.6L engine first pushed 105 then 115 hp. The chassis is the most efficient of its generation...

  • When it was released, the BX was the first entirely new Citroën since its acquisition by Peugeot. Before the release of the Peugeot 205, it was to this car that was entrusted the complex mission of saving the French group. The BX was a true Citroën with a hydropneumatic suspension, a mono steering wheel, and many innovations. To limit weight, the tailgate...

  • In post-war France, it was necessary to motorize the country as it rebuilt itself. Craftsmen and tradesmen needed commercial vehicles and Peugeot understood this. The Sochalienne brand developed several variants of its utility, like the commercial version, small and large vans, ambulances and pickups. These utility versions were known for their robustness...

  • The Renault 8 Gordini was a legend, and the 12 had the difficult task of succeeding it. At the time the car shocked many, as it was the first true sports cars to be equipped with a traction and not a propulsion system. The genetic patrimony of the car was conserved with its famous white stripes, a relic of the years of Amédée Gordini. To shed some surplus...

  • At the beginning of the Sixties, Ford was trying its hardest to buy out the venerable Ferrari brand. After lengthy negotiations and a deal seeming increasingly likely, Enzo Ferrari dismissed the whole matter, rebutting his American homologue. From that day forward, Henry Ford II had but one thing on his mind: to take his revenge on the circuit by beating...

  • Much like a Fiat 500, the Panda appeared in 1979 within Italy to take the mantle of the small urban car. The vehicle was designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro, who proposed it to Fiat after Renault refused replacing the R4 with it. At the moment of its presentation, the new head of the Italian manufacturer, Vittorio Ghidella, who hated the Panda, pragmatically...

  • The Jaguar D type was a direct consequence of the manufacturer’s foray into competition cars. The felines performances were extraordinary for the time. Its 6-cylinder 3442 cm3 engine had 250 horsepower, pushing it to a top speed of 260 km/h. It could also break the 0 to 100 mark in 4,7 seconds. As the first car in the world to have brake discs, it was...

  • So as to reinvigorate sales of the ageing Simca 1000, the brand decided to organise the Simca challenge. This budget competition was an instant hit, and left the brand with a number of ideas. A Rally version, then a Rally 1, were included in the catalogue. The Rally 2 followed with a 1294 cm³ engine pushing 82 horsepower and a better balance of weight....

  • The Renault Fuego was a 4-seat coupé presented at the Geneva car show in March of 1980. It replaced the Renault 15 and 17. Designed under the guidance of Robert Opron, it used as many elements as it could of the Renault 18 sedan, produced at the same time. Its design was characteristic of the eighties with rounded forms and an air penetration coefficient...

  • Presented in November 1982, the Mercedes sedan inaugurated in a new offer for the German brand. More compact than its siblings, more modern, it was designed to conquer a new clientèle, a younger generation. Remaining true to its propulsion based technology, it adopted modern solutions, notably in terms of security. The ABS and Airbag were optimised as...

  • The Bugatti Type 35 was a contributing factor to forging the legend of the Bugatti on an international scale. With over 2000 victories in competition, it made its mark on every type of track. The 35 B version was the final version of the series, coming out in 1927. Borrowing the 2,3 L engine from the Type 35 T, the latter was improved upon to produce 138...

  • When the 57 project started, it was Jean, Etore Bugatti's son, who was in charge of the team of designers for the brand. The Coupé SC was a car in its own category, the most expensive of the brand. Its weight was reduced and the aero dynamicity was redesigned to achieve a top speed of 210 km/h. The aluminium panels used for the bodywork were held together...

  • Transform the Renault 5 into a racing car: this was the goal for the brand when designing the Turbo version. Everything was rethought for the car, with the sole objective being its performance on the circuit. The weight distribution was redone with a centrally-mounted rear engine, receiving a turbo for a specific tuning. With a civilian career allowing it...

  • At the end of the fifties, the Citroën brand was limited to the 2CV and the DS. Citroën wanted to equip itself with a medium-size sedan to occupy the market between the two extremes. The design was given to Flaminio Bretoni, godfather of the Traction, 2CV, and DS. To ensure a roofguard optimised for the rear passengers and offer a more comfortable...

  • This large sedan of 4.72 metres was launched in November 1975. It is an icon within the history of Mercedes. Its extreme robustness made the car a legend, and many say that is the most reliable car ever built. This can be said even more so for the 200 D version that became a staple for taxi drivers around the world. Often living a second life in the East...

  • The Ford Capri was the European coupé of the oval brand. This version is the Mark III, and perpetuated the tradition of a European Mustang. Distinctive due to its lengthy bonnet, it modernised Ford design at the end of the 1970s. This 2.8 litre version was equipped with a 5-speed gearbox, an injector, and had 160 horsepower. Produced in the factory of...

  • The Jaguar XK140 is a classic of the brand. Coming out in 1954, it was an evolution of the XK120. The goal of this evolution was to adapt the English carmaker's offer to the American market. Bringing with it improved comfort, more habitability and redesigned suspensions. The engine was a 6-cylinder 3.4 litre, and was produced until 1957 to the tune of...

Showing 1 - 18 of 36 items